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An earthquake is a sudden, rapid shaking of the earth caused by the breaking and shifting of rock beneath the earth’s surface. Earthquakes strike suddenly, without warning, and they can occur at any time of the year, day or night. Forty-five states and territories in the United States are at moderate to very high risk of earthquakes, and they are located in every region of the country. Learn how to prepare for an earthquake with the following safety tips provided by the American Red Cross.

 

Bridges/Overpasses/Underpasses/Tunnels:

 

In the event there is an earthquake and you want to get home to your loved ones, will your normal route be obstructed? Many people do not take in consideration the bridges, overpasses, underpasses, or tunnels they come across when they travel to and from work that may become an obstacle. In the event there is an obstruction, what is your alternative route to get to your family?

 

The next time you travel to and from work, count how many possible obstructions can prevent you from getting home to your family. This includes, but not limited to, freeway interchanges, other roads, flood control channels, bike/walkway pathways, and tunnels, all subjected to collapse during a large earthquake.

 

Find alternative routes and a different mode of transportation to get to your family. A natural reaction is to get into your car and to drive. If there are obstructions and the traffic is congested, not moving because of obstructions, how are you going to get to your family?

 

An average person can walk 3 miles per hour on an unobstructed course. (That equals 20 minutes per mile)  Also, an average person can ride 15 miles per hour on an unobstructed course. (.25 per minute= 1 mile per 4 minutes=15 miles per hour) So how long will it take you to get to your family?

 

With that said, when was the last time you walked a mile? How long did it take? When was the last time you sat on a bicycle? How far did you ride?  

 

 

DO YOU HAVE TO HAVE A PLAN?

 

You are on the road. An earthquake hits. An obstruction occurred due to a collapse. There are vehicles around you, not moving, what do you do?

 

You are on your way home, you have to pick up your child from school or daycare. An earthquake hits. An obstruction occurred due to a collapse. There are vehicles around you, not moving, what do you do?

 

You are on your way home, you have to pick up your child from school or daycare. An earthquake hits. An obstruction occurred due to a collapse. There are vehicles around you, not moving, the cell towers are not working, what do you do?

 

What is your plan? Do you even have one?

 

You are at work, at the store, at a friend’s, anywhere but close to home:

 

If a big earthquakes hits, will you panic? Most likely you will. That is normal. The key is not to panic and stay focused. Learn your alternatives. What route will you take to get home, where is the gathering spot? What supplies do you have to survive for about a week? The misconception is, does my vehicle have enough gasoline. By that time it’s too late. If the routes obstructed and you can’t drive anywhere, what good is a full tank of gas?

 

Do you have a portable radio to try to get news stations? Do you have flashlights? Do you have enough batteries for the flashlights and radio? Do you have a BBQ? Do you have enough propane or charcoal? Can foods? …. Work in Progress  

 

AVOID  CANDLES!  

 

If there are aftershocks, the candles may fall or an object may fall on them, and start a fire. Therefore, if you live any a multi-family unit, you may be the cause of others to be displaced due to fire damage.

 

DON’T USE CANDLES!